4 places that could become Charlotte’s latest historic landmarks

4 places that could become Charlotte’s latest historic landmarks
  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share by Email
  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share by Email

Four places in Charlotte could become the city’s newest historic landmarks.

You might not have heard of any of them. But they represent a pretty neat cross-section of Charlotte history.

The Charlotte City Council will hold public hearings on Monday on whether they should be designated historic landmarks — meaning that they would get a lot more protection from destruction or modification going forward.

Here’s a look at the four of them.

Biddleville Cemetery

Photo via the city of Charlotte

Photo via the city of Charlotte

What is it: Biddleville is the name of the historic African-American community that grew up around the Biddle Institute, now Johnson C. Smith University in West End, after the Civil War. This cemetery has the graves of prominent people in that community and black soldiers from the Spanish-American War and both world wars.

Advertisement

Read the Historic Landmarks Commission’s full history report here.

How old is it: The oldest grave here (seen above) dates to 1894.

biddleville-cemetery-map

Charles E. Barnhardt House

Photo via the Historic Landmarks Commission

Photo via the Historic Landmarks Commission

What is it: This Depression-era estate is one of the best-preserved homes in Plaza Midwood, a rare example of architecture from its time. The Landmarks Commission is working on a plan for permanent preservation of the property.

How old is it: The home was built in 1938.

charles-e-barnhardt-house-map

Dilworth Airplane Bungalow

Photo via the Historic Landmarks Commission

Photo via the Historic Landmarks Commission

What is it: This is a Craftsman type home more common in California — and this is the only one remaining in Charlotte. The stonework is rare, and the house is unusually well-preserved.

How old is it: The home was built in 1925.

airplane-bungalow-map

Midwood Elementary School

Photo via the Historic Landmarks Commission

Photo via the Historic Landmarks Commission

What is it: This was the first school to serve Central Avenue, and served from the 1930s until 2011. It’s now home to the International House. It was originally called Lawyers Road School and cost about $31,000 to build.

How old is it: The school was built in 1935.

midwood-elementary-school-map

Story Views:
SIGN UP FOR THE DAILY AGENDA
Join the 54,741 smart Charlotteans that receive our daily newsletter.
"It's good. I promise." - Ted   Ted Williams